Fourth International Symposium on Coma and Death (Havana, Cuba, March 9-12, 2004)

Dear Colleagues:

Since ancient times, man has pondered the mystery of his own death. It seemed that by knowing the meaning of his death, he would be prepared to understand the reason for his life. For ages, people considered life to exist as long as an individual was breathing. It was later realized that respiration was a means of maintaining the heart, which circulated the blood. The focus then turned to cardio-respiratory function. But, in the middle of this century, physicians became aware that the brain required much more energy than other organs and that, if its needs were not met, it would cease to function, while other parts of the body (requiring less energy) might regain their activity provided that respiration was supported by intensive care. The result would be a dead brain in a viable body. French neurologists and neurophysiologists documented this at the end of the 1950s. Is such a patient alive or dead?
Although some decades have passed, there are still worldwide controversies about a concept of human death on neurological grounds. There are also disagreements on the diagnostic criteria for brain death, whether clinical alone or clinical plus ancillary tests. Moreover, some scholars who were strong defenders of a brain-based standard of death are now favoring a circulatory-respiratory standard.
This was the scene we faced in 1992, 1996, 1996, and 2000, when we convoked colleagues from around the world to attend the First, Second, and Third International Symposia on Coma and Death. These were truly remarkable gatherings of an impressive number of the most outstanding personalities in the field. Scientific discussions were enriched by multi-disciplinary approaches covering most brain-death-related issues. To be sure, not all differences of opinion were resolved in the debates; therefore, we are far from a final consensus on the subject of human death.
We are pleased to announce the holding of the IV INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON COMA AND DEATH at the Havana International Conference Center on March 9-12, 2004. Please mark these dates on your calendar and inform us if you would like to be included on our mailing list.
Our main goal is to provide a suitable scientific platform to discuss all topics related to human death and coma. Cubans, as hosts, will sincerely offer a warm hospitality. This small Caribbean Island, with the greenness of its countryside surrounded by an incredible blue sea, will provide a most proper venue to remind us that the main motivation for discussing death is the betterment of life.
Sincerely,
Calixto Machado, MD, Ph.D.
President of the Symposium
 

 

Main Topics

Human Death and related issues
Conceptual approach to human death
Brain death criteria in different countries
Ancillary tests in brain death
Brain death in childhood
Anencephalic infants
End-of-life dilemmas: persistent vegetative state, dementia, terminal patient, euthanasia, assisted suicide, etc.
Legal considerations surrounding brain death and related states
Philosophical, theological, sociological, historical and cultural considerations of human death
Organ transplantation
Coma
Neurophysiology of consciousness generation
Etiologies of coma: head trauma, stroke, metabolic, etc.
Ancillary tests for predicting outcome in coma
Neuro-intensive care
Neuromonitoring
Neuroprotección
New trends in cardio-pulmonar-cerebral resuscitation

Speakers

Adam Zeman, MD (England)
Alastair V. Campbell, MD (England)
Angel Esteban, MD (Spain)
Diego Gracia Guillén, MD (Spain)
Francisco Murillo, MD (Spain)
Jorge Matias Guiu, MD (Spain)
José Dominguez Roldán (Spain)
Juan Sahuquillo, MD (Spain)
Margaret Lock, Ph.D. (Canada)
Bryan Young, MD (Canada)
Joseph Boyle, Ph.D. (Canada)
Von Wild (Germany)
Antonio Enamorado, MD (Cuba)
Calixto Machado, MD (Cuba)
Desiderio Pozo, MD (Cuba)
Ismael Clark, MD (Cuba)
Julio C. Peñalver, MD, Ph.D. (Cuba)
Noel González, MD (Cuba)
Raúl Herrera, MD (Cuba)
Sofía Sordo, Ph.D. (Cuba)
Catherine Fischer, MD (France)
Corina Puppo, MD (Uruguay)
David Lamb, Ph.D. (Gales)
Enrico Facco, MD (Italy)
Ignacio Carrasco, MD, Ph.D. (Italy)
Franz Gerstenbrand (Austria)
Jean-Michel Guérit, MD (Belgium)
Phillipe Hantson, MD (Belgium)
Jorge Curbelo (Brazil)
Raul Marino Jr, Ph.D. (Brazil)
Almir Ferreira de Andrade, MD (Brazil)
Josef Seifert, Ph.D. (Liechtenstein)
John Haldane, Ph.D. (Scotland)
Mario Shkurovich, MD (Mexico)
Michael Piradov, MD (Russia)
Alireza Bagheri (Japan)
Nora Machado, Ph.D (Sweden)
Prof. Murat Emre (Turkia)
R. Alta Charo, Ph.D. (USA)
Antonio Culebras, MD (USA)
Arthur Grant, MD (USA)
Bernard Gert, Ph.D. (USA)
D. Alan Shewmon, MD (USA)
E. Haavi Morreim, PhD (USA)
Ed Berger, PhD (USA)
Fred Plum, MD (USA)
James Hughes, Ph.D. (USA)
Jeffrey Frank, MD (USA)
John M. Haas , Ph.D. (USA)
John P. Lizza, Ph.D. (USA)
José I. Suárez, MD (USA)
Joseph Fins, MD (USA)
Julius Korein, MD (USA)
Linda Emanuel, MD (USA)
Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Ph.D. (USA)
Nicholas D. Schiff, MD (USA)
Peter Safar, MD (USA)
Robert R. Young, MD (USA)
Ronald Cranford, MD (USA)
Steven Miles, MD (USA)
Stuart Youngner, MD (USA)
Tom Tomlinson, Ph.D. (USA)
William Winslade, MD (USA)
Stephen mayer (USA)
Joseph T. Giacino, Ph.D. (USA)
David Pincus (USA)
Teddy Roth (USA)
J. Russell Burck, Ph.D. (USA)
Lisa Anderson-Shaw, RN, DPH (USA)
Mark Sheldon, PhD (USA)

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Fourth International Symposium on Coma and Death (Havana, Cuba, March 9-12, 2004)

Dear Colleagues:

Since ancient times, man has pondered the mystery of his own death. It seemed that by knowing the meaning of his death, he would be prepared to understand the reason for his life. For ages, people considered life to exist as long as an individual was breathing. It was later realized that respiration was a means of maintaining the heart, which circulated the blood. The focus then turned to cardio-respiratory function. But, in the middle of this century, physicians became aware that the brain required much more energy than other organs and that, if its needs were not met, it would cease to function, while other parts of the body (requiring less energy) might regain their activity provided that respiration was supported by intensive care. The result would be a dead brain in a viable body. French neurologists and neurophysiologists documented this at the end of the 1950s. Is such a patient alive or dead?
Although some decades have passed, there are still worldwide controversies about a concept of human death on neurological grounds. There are also disagreements on the diagnostic criteria for brain death, whether clinical alone or clinical plus ancillary tests. Moreover, some scholars who were strong defenders of a brain-based standard of death are now favoring a circulatory-respiratory standard.
This was the scene we faced in 1992, 1996, 1996, and 2000, when we convoked colleagues from around the world to attend the First, Second, and Third International Symposia on Coma and Death. These were truly remarkable gatherings of an impressive number of the most outstanding personalities in the field. Scientific discussions were enriched by multi-disciplinary approaches covering most brain-death-related issues. To be sure, not all differences of opinion were resolved in the debates; therefore, we are far from a final consensus on the subject of human death.
We are pleased to announce the holding of the IV INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON COMA AND DEATH at the Havana International Conference Center on March 9-12, 2004. Please mark these dates on your calendar and inform us if you would like to be included on our mailing list.
Our main goal is to provide a suitable scientific platform to discuss all topics related to human death and coma. Cubans, as hosts, will sincerely offer a warm hospitality. This small Caribbean Island, with the greenness of its countryside surrounded by an incredible blue sea, will provide a most proper venue to remind us that the main motivation for discussing death is the betterment of life.
Sincerely,
Calixto Machado, MD, Ph.D.
President of the Symposium
Main Topics

Human Death and related issues
Conceptual approach to human death
Brain death criteria in different countries
Ancillary tests in brain death
Brain death in childhood
Anencephalic infants
End-of-life dilemmas: persistent vegetative state, dementia, terminal patient, euthanasia, assisted suicide, etc.
Legal considerations surrounding brain death and related states
Philosophical, theological, sociological, historical and cultural considerations of human death
Organ transplantation
Coma
Neurophysiology of consciousness generation
Etiologies of coma: head trauma, stroke, metabolic, etc.
Ancillary tests for predicting outcome in coma
Neuro-intensive care
Neuromonitoring
Neuroprotección
New trends in cardio-pulmonar-cerebral resuscitation


Speakers

Adam Zeman, MD (England)
Alastair V. Campbell, MD (England)
Angel Esteban, MD (Spain)
Diego Gracia Guillén, MD (Spain)
Francisco Murillo, MD (Spain)
Jorge Matias Guiu, MD (Spain)
José Dominguez Roldán (Spain)
Juan Sahuquillo, MD (Spain)
Margaret Lock, Ph.D. (Canada)
Bryan Young, MD (Canada)
Joseph Boyle, Ph.D. (Canada)
Von Wild (Germany)
Antonio Enamorado, MD (Cuba)
Calixto Machado, MD (Cuba)
Desiderio Pozo, MD (Cuba)
Ismael Clark, MD (Cuba)
Julio C. Peñalver, MD, Ph.D. (Cuba)
Noel González, MD (Cuba)
Raúl Herrera, MD (Cuba)
Sofía Sordo, Ph.D. (Cuba)
Catherine Fischer, MD (France)
Corina Puppo, MD (Uruguay)
David Lamb, Ph.D. (Gales)
Enrico Facco, MD (Italy)
Ignacio Carrasco, MD, Ph.D. (Italy)
Franz Gerstenbrand (Austria)
Jean-Michel Guérit, MD (Belgium)
Phillipe Hantson, MD (Belgium)
Jorge Curbelo (Brazil)
Raul Marino Jr, Ph.D. (Brazil)
Almir Ferreira de Andrade, MD (Brazil)
Josef Seifert, Ph.D. (Liechtenstein)
John Haldane, Ph.D. (Scotland)
Mario Shkurovich, MD (Mexico)
Michael Piradov, MD (Russia)
Alireza Bagheri (Japan)
Nora Machado, Ph.D (Sweden)
Prof. Murat Emre (Turkia)
R. Alta Charo, Ph.D. (USA)
Antonio Culebras, MD (USA)
Arthur Grant, MD (USA)
Bernard Gert, Ph.D. (USA)
D. Alan Shewmon, MD (USA)
E. Haavi Morreim, PhD (USA)
Ed Berger, PhD (USA)
Fred Plum, MD (USA)
James Hughes, Ph.D. (USA)
Jeffrey Frank, MD (USA)
John M. Haas , Ph.D. (USA)
John P. Lizza, Ph.D. (USA)
José I. Suárez, MD (USA)
Joseph Fins, MD (USA)
Julius Korein, MD (USA)
Linda Emanuel, MD (USA)
Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Ph.D. (USA)
Nicholas D. Schiff, MD (USA)
Peter Safar, MD (USA)
Robert R. Young, MD (USA)
Ronald Cranford, MD (USA)
Steven Miles, MD (USA)
Stuart Youngner, MD (USA)
Tom Tomlinson, Ph.D. (USA)
William Winslade, MD (USA)
Stephen mayer (USA)
Joseph T. Giacino, Ph.D. (USA)
David Pincus (USA)
Teddy Roth (USA)
J. Russell Burck, Ph.D. (USA)
Lisa Anderson-Shaw, RN, DPH (USA)
Mark Sheldon, PhD (USA)
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